silhouttes of soldiers run from the Russian flag backdrop to a Ukrainian flag

Princeton voices: Speaking out on the Russian invasion of Ukraine

Feb. 25, 2022, 1:54 p.m.

As the world grapples in real time with the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Princeton scholars are speaking to the moment. Many Princeton faculty members, alumni, staff and students are sharing their expertise and perspectives in op-eds, on television and cable news programs, online and in print publications, on virtual panels and across social media.

Read, view and listen to some of their contributions to the international conversation. We will continue to update this roundup.

Expert panels/public conversations

Upcoming

  • Princeton Public Lectures: Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, 6-7:15 p.m. Tuesday, April 12, Richardson Auditorium. "Lessons from the Edge," a conversation with Kim Lane Sheppelle." Yovanovitch is the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine (2009-17) and a senior fellow in the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Sheppelle is the Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs and the University Center for Human Values. Free tickets are required for in-person participation. Attendees must attest to being fully vaccinated and boosted. If you are unable to participate in-person, you may watch the live event via Zoom webinar; register online.

Recent

  • "Energy and Economics — Impacts of the Russian Invasion," 3 p.m. Friday, March 25, Moderator Razia Iqbal, anchor of the BBC World Service's Newshour and Ferris Professor of Journalism, will lead a discussion with economic and energy experts from Princeton: Markus Brunnermeier, the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Economics; Meg Jacobs, senior research scholar and lecturer in public affairs; and Jesse Jenkins, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. Register for the Zoom webinar or view live on YouTube. This event is hosted by the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs with support from the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, the Department of Economics, the Program in Journalism and the Office of Communications.
  • "Understanding Our New World," 10 a.m. Central (11 a.m. EDT) Thursday, March 17, with Julian Zelizer, the Malcolm Stevenson Forbes, Class of 1941 Professor of History and Public Affairs, on Paul Simon Public Policy Institute Virtual Conversation Series, speaking with Institute Director John Shaw on the roots of political polarization in the U.S. and Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Registration required; register online.
  • Freedom and Self-Determination in Times of Aggression," 10-11 a.m. Wednesday, March 16, 019 Bendheim Hall, and livestreamed on the University's YouTube channel. Public statement by Her Excellency Dominique Hasler, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Education and Sport of the Principality of Liechtenstein. Hosted by Princeton's Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination. Princeton students, faculty and staff who are permitted on campus are welcome to attend the event in person. Due to Princeton University Covid restrictions, we are obligated to keep a record of every person that attends. Therefore, in order to attend the event in person, you must RSVP.
  • India and China’s response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine," noon Tuesday, March 15, Louis A. Simpson Building, Room A71. Princeton experts will unpack India and China’s response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in the context of Asian and global geopolitics, and what it means for the United States. Moderated by Anu Ramaswami, the Sanjay Swani '87 Professor of India Studies and director of the M.S. Chada Center for global India. Panelists will share historical perspectives, interpretations of current events and discuss potential future trajectories. Featuring Pratap Bhanu Mehta, the Laurence S. Rockefeller Professor for Distinguished Teaching; Iryna Vushko, assistant professor of history and a native of L'viv, Ukraine; and Yu Xie, the Bert G. Kerstetter '66 University Professor of Sociology and director of the Center for Contemporary China. Registration required, open to Princeton University ID holders only; register online.
  • "Let's Talk About: Russian Misinformation and Cybersecurity," noon Friday, March 11, panel moderated by Asha Rangappa, a 1996 alumna, CNN legal and national security analyst and former FBI agent. Featuring Jacob Shapiro, professor of politics and international affairs; Sergey Sanovich, postdoctoral research associate, Center for Information Technology Policy; and Alicia Wanless, director of the Partnership for Countering Influence Operations, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. This weekly series is hosted by the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs with support from Princeton's Office of Communications. Watch on YouTube.
  • Why don’t Russians rebel? Putin’s war and antiwar protests in Russia," noon Monday, March 7, panel moderated by Ekaterina Pravilova, the Rosengarten Chair of Modern and Contemporary History, professor of history, and acting director of the Program in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies. Featuring: Tikhon Dzyadko, editor-in-chief, TV Rain; Katerina Kotrikadze, head of the news department, TV Rain; and Greg Yudin, sociologist, Higher School of Economics, Moscow. Registration required. Register online.

Week of Feb. 27

  • Ukraine — Global Ramifications," noon Friday, March 4, panel moderated by Razia Iqbal, visiting Ferris Professor of Journalism, visiting lecturer in the Humanities Council and BBC Newshour host. Featuring: Filiz Garip, professor of sociology and public affairs; Brian Katulis, MPA '00 and senior fellow at the Center for American Progress; and Michael Reynolds, associate professor of Near Eastern studies. Register for the Zoom webinar or view live on YouTube. This weekly series is hosted by the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs with support from Princeton's Office of Communications. Watch the Feb. 25 panel "Princeton experts discuss the Russian invasion of Ukraine" on YouTube.
  • Implications of Sanctions on the Russian Economy," 12:30 p.m. Thursday, March 3. A webinar, hosted by the Markus Academy, with Sergei Guriev, professor at Sciences Po and formerly the chief economist at the EBRD and rector of Moscow’s New Economic School.  Introductory remarks by Markus Brunnermeier, the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Economics and director of Princeton's Bendheim Center for Finance.
  • "The Ukraine Crisis and World Order," March 1. A conversation, hosted by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies and Reimagining World Order, with Jeremy Adelman, the Henry Charles Lea Professor of History; Mark Beissinger, the Henry W. Putnam Professor of Politics; G. John Ikenberry, Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs; Melissa Lee, assistant professor of politics and international affairs; and Iryna Vushko, assistant professor of history and a native of L’viv, Ukraine.

Faculty and leadership

Recent

Week of March 20

Week of March 13

  • Aaron Friedberg, professor of politics and international affairs, op-ed in Bloomberg, "The West Misjudged Russia. It Shouldn’t Repeat That Mistake with China."
  • Stephen Kotkin, the John P. Birkelund '52 Professor in History and International Affairs, co-director of the Program in History and the Practice of Diplomacy, and director of Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies. David Remnick's Q&A with Kotkin for The New Yorker (includes video) about Putin, the invasion of Ukraine, the American and European response, and what comes next. Remnick is a 1981 alumnus and editor of The New Yorker.
  • Tim Searchinger, senior research scholar, quoted in New Scientist, "Cutting biofuels can help avoid global food shock from Ukraine war."
  • Julian Zelizer, the Malcolm Stevenson Forbes, Class of 1941 Professor of History and Public Affairs, and Sam Wang, professor of neuroscience, discuss the current state of the war in Ukraine, how the media is responding and what might lay ahead politically in "The War in Ukraine and U.S. Politics," the latest episode of their podcast "Politics & Polls."

Week of March 6

Week of Feb. 27

  • Christopher L. Eisgruber, President of the University and the Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and the University Center for Human Values. "President's Blog: Statement Regarding the War in Ukraine."
  • Filiz Garip, professor of sociology and public affairs, in the Philadelphia Inquirer (op-ed), "How do you pack for an escape? A refugee's story."
  • Alexander Glaser, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and international affairs and co-director of the Program in Science and Global Security. Business Insider España resurfaces his research that simulates an escalating war between the U.S. and Russia.
  • Eddie Glaude, Jr., the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor and professor of African American studies. On Zerlina, he talks about the differences between media coverage of the Ukraine crisis and that of crises in the Middle East (also carried on MSNBC).
  • Razia Iqbal, Ferris Professor of Journalism, visiting lecturer in the Humanities Council and BBC Newshour host, tweets a thread on the “racist, colonialist and orientalist perspectives” that are emerging in the media coverage of the invasion and its impact.
  • Jesse Jenkins, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, tweets a thread on the geopolitical consequences of Russian gas dependence. And, in E&E News’ Energywire, "What the Russia crisis means for U.S. electricity mix" ( a version of this report also ran in Politico.)
  • Ekaterina Pravilova, the Rosengarten Chair of Modern and Contemporary History, professor of history, and acting director of the Program in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies. Interviewed on WNYC, "How Putin’s War Against Ukraine is Changing the Lives of Russians."
  • Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, professor of African American studies, was quoted at SBS news for her condemnation of a CBS News correspondent’s commentary.
  • Iryna Vushko, assistant professor of history, shares her perspectives as a native of L’viv, Ukraine, and a parent of a young child, in the Daily Princetonian, "As Ukraine fights for its freedom, we must conquer our fear."
  • Omar Wasow, visiting research collaborator in politics. A May 27, 2020 thread of his is picking up renewed steam as it relates to nonviolent tactics that Ukrainian civilians can use to fight back.

Week of Feb. 20

  • Amaney Jamal, dean of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Politics. Dean’s Dialogue blog post "In Solidarity: Ukraine."
  • Harold James, the Claude and Lore Kelly Professor in European Studies, and professor of history and international affairs, on Project Syndicate, "A New Détente."
  • Stephen Kotkin, the John P. Birkelund '52 Professor in History and International Affairs, co-director of the Program in History and the Practice of Diplomacy, director of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, on Bloomberg (op-ed), "Which Sanctions Would Hurt Putin the Most?"
  • Paul Krugman, professor of politics and international affairs, emeritus, at The New York Times (op-ed), “Laundered Money Could Be Putin’s Achilles’ Heel." On Twitter, he weighs in on the impact on wealthy Russians
  • Atif Mian, the John H. Laporte, Jr. Class of 1967 Professor in Public Policy and Finance, professor of economics and public affairs, and director of the Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy and Finance, tweets about the potential economic fallout.
  • Anne-Marie Slaughter, CEO of New America; the Bert G. Kerstetter '66 University Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs and former dean of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs; former director of policy planning at the U.S. State Department; and 1980 alumna, joins Foreign Policy Live, “What is Next for Ukraine?"
  • Julian Zelizer, the Malcolm Stevenson Forbes, Class of 1941 Professor of History and Public Affairs, on CNN (op-ed), "How Biden's political future could rest on Ukraine."

Alumni

Recent

  • David Remnick, a 1981 alumnus and editor of The New Yorker. Q&A with Stephen Kotkin, the John P. Birkelund '52 Professor in History and International Affairs, co-director of the Program in History and the Practice of Diplomacy, and director of Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies. This video conversation focuses on Putin, the invasion of Ukraine, the American and European response, and what comes next.

Week of March 6

Week of Feb. 27

Week of Feb. 20

Staff

Week of Feb. 20

Undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral research associates

Week of March 20

Week of March 6

Week of Feb. 27

Week of Feb. 20